Graduate

Graduate Degrees in Computer Science and Engineering:

  • Master of Science (M.S.) in Computer Science and Engineering
  • Master of Science in Engineering (M.S.E.) in Computer Science and Engineering
  • Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Computer Science and Engineering

Graduate Degrees in Electrical & Computer Engineering:

  • Master of Science (M.S.) in Electrical & Computer Engineering
  • Master of Science in Engineering (M.S.E.) in Electrical & Computer Engineering
  • Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Electrical & Computer Engineering
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) is one of the highest-ranking EECS departments in the country, and many of the faculty are recognized as leaders in their field. Please review Degree information in both divisions.

Master of Science / Master of Science in Engineering

The M.S. (Master’s of Science) and M.S.E. (Master’s of Science in Engineering) degrees differ mainly in name. The degree requirements are the same. Students with a bachelor’s degree in engineering can elect either degree. Students without an engineering bachelor’s degree are eligible only for the M.S. The principal requirements for the specific M.S. and M.S.E. degrees are listed below. (A more complete statement on master’s degree requirements is available on the Web: http://www.eecs.umich.edu/eecs/graduate/index.html.)

M.S. and M.S.E. in Computer Science and Engineering

A student must satisfy the regulations of the Rackham School of Graduate Studies, the College of Engineering, and the regulations as specified by the program brochure(s) and the program office.

A student must earn at least 30 credit hours of graduate level coursework, of which at least 24 hours must be technical courses, at least 15 hours must be CSE coursework at the 500 level or higher (excluding credit hours earned in individual study, research or seminar courses). The student must also satisfy course requirements in “breadth” areas of software, hardware, artificial intelligence, and theory. A maximum of six credit hours of individual study, research and seminar courses will be accepted toward the master’s degree. The VLSI concentration has slightly different course requirements; please refer to the CSE Brochure available on the Web for details.

The program requires that the grade point average received in CSE coursework must be at least 3.0 (based on Rackham’s 4.0 scale). An individual course grade of B- or better is required for the credit hours received in any course to be counted towards any master’s degree requirement. A master’s thesis is optional. Credit hours transferred may be applied to meet any master’s degree requirement except the 15 credit hours of 500 level CSE coursework required. (Rackham specifies limitations to the circumstances under which credits may be transferred. See the Rackham Student Handbook.) Courses of an insufficiently advanced level, or which substantially duplicate in level and/or content courses already completed by the student, may not be counted as meeting any master’s degree requirements.

M.S. and M.S.E. in Electrical & Computer Engineering

The Master’s Program in Electrical & Computer Engineering covers topics such as Applied Electromagnetics & RF Circuits, Communications, Computer Vision, Control Systems, Embedded Systems, Integrated Circuits & VLSI, MEMS & Microsystems, Optics & Photonics, Power & Energy, Robotics, Signal and Image Processing & Machine Learning, and Solid State & Nanotechnology. A student must earn at least 30 credit hours of graduate-level coursework, of which at least 24 credit hours must be in technical courses, at least 12 credit hours must be EECS coursework at the 500 level or higher (excluding credit hours earned in individual study, research, or seminar courses, other departments or universities), and 9 credit hours from an ECE major area including at least 6 at the 500 level or above, and at least 6 credit hours in courses outside the major area, often outside of ECE. A maximum of 3 credit hours of S/U courses that are not directed study will be accepted toward the degree. At most 6 credit hours of directed study will be accepted. Course grades must be “B-” or better in order to be counted towards any requirements. A grade point average of “B” or higher is required overall. A master’s thesis is optional.

Doctor of Philosophy

Ph.D. in Computer Science and Engineering

The doctoral degree is conferred in recognition of marked ability and scholarship in some relatively broad field of knowledge. A part of the work consists of regularly scheduled graduate courses of instruction in the chosen field and in such cognate subjects as may be required by the committee. In addition, the student must pursue independent investigation in a subdivision of the selected field and must present the result of the investigation in the form of a dissertation.

A student becomes an applicant for the doctorate when admitted to the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies and accepted in a field of specialization. Candidacy is achieved when the student demonstrates competence in her/his broad field of knowledge through completion of a prescribed set of courses and passing a comprehensive examination.

In most areas, a student must complete required coursework, pass a comprehensive examination and any other program requirements and be recommended for candidacy for the doctorate. A special doctoral committee is appointed for each applicant to supervise the work of the student both as to election of courses and in preparation of the dissertation.

Requirements regarding foreign language and non-technical courses are left to individual departments or programs and to the Graduate School. A prospective doctoral student should consult the program advisor regarding specific details.

A pamphlet that describes the general procedure leading to the doctorate is available in the Graduate School office, 1004 Rackham Building, upon request.

Ph.D. in Electrical & Computer Engineering

The Ph.D. Program in Electrical & Computer Engineering covers topics such as Applied Electromagnetics & RF Circuits, Communications, Computer Vision, Control Systems, Embedded Systems, Integrated Circuits & VLSI, MEMS & Microsystems, Optics & Photonics, Power & Energy, Robotics, Signal and Image Processing & Machine Learning, and Solid State & Nanotechnology. A student must earn at least 36 credit hours of graduate-level coursework, of which at least 30 credit hours must be in technical courses, at least 12 credit hours must be EECS coursework at the 500 level or higher (excluding credit hours earned in individual study, research, or seminar courses, other departments or universities), and 9 credit hours from an ECE major area including at least 6 at the 500 level or above, and at least 6 credit hours in courses outside the major area, often outside of ECE. A maximum of 3 credit hours of S/U courses that are not directed study will be accepted toward the degree. At most 6 credit hours of directed study will be accepted. Course grades must be “B-” or better in order to be counted towards any requirements. A grade point average of “B” or higher is required overall. In addition, students must complete the following milestones: qualification exam, thesis proposal, dissertation, and dissertation defense.  There is an annual progress report which students must achieve satisfactory progress as determined by research advisor in order to continue in the program.

See the ECE Graduate Program manual for details.

The 3.4 Program for EECS and Computer Science majors only

Students with at least a 3.4 G.P.A. in their major course work and overall G.P.A. at the time of application and graduation may apply to the ECE (not CSE) master’s degree program. For more information, go to the website (http://ece.umich.edu/eecs/undergraduate/3.4Program.html) or contact an ECE Graduate Program Coordinator for details.